Lieutenant General (Ret.) Frank G. Klotz

Lieutenant General (Ret.) Frank G. Klotz

Under Secretary for Nuclear Security
National Nuclear Security Administration
NSWG

Lieutenant General Frank G. Klotz is the Department of Energy’s Under Secretary for Nuclear Security and Administrator for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). He has more than 20 years experience in both military positions and policy and management roles, with his time at the U.S. Embassy Moscow leading to a particular specialism in U.S.-Russian relations.

Lieutenant General Frank G. Klotz is the Department of Energy’s Under Secretary for Nuclear Security and Administrator for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), responsible for the management and operation of the NNSA, as well as policy matters across the Department of Energy and NNSA enterprise.

General Klotz has previously served in a variety of military and national security positions. As the Commander of Air Force Global Strike Command, he established and led a brand new 23,000-person organization that merged responsibility for all U.S. nuclear-capable bombers and land-based missiles under a single chain of command. Prior to that, General Klotz served at the White House from 2001 to 2003 as the Director for Nuclear Policy and Arms Control on the National Security Council, where he represented the White House in the talks that led to the 2002 Moscow Treaty to reduce strategic nuclear weapons.

During his career, General Klotz was also a Senior Fellow for Strategic Studies and Arms Control at the Council on Foreign Relations.

He has a particular interest in and knowledge of U.S.-Russian relations, having served as the defense attaché at U.S. Embassy Moscow during an eventful period for relations between the two countries.

A distinguished graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy, General Klotz attended Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar, where he earned an MPhil in international relations and a DPhil in politics. He is also a graduate of the National War College in Washington, D.C.